If you’re a big fan of progressive house/techno legend Eric Prydz, then there’s a massive interview you have to check out right away.

The Swede responsible for gargantuan anthems like “Pjanoo”, “Call On Me”, and “Every Day” along with announcing his new album and tour slated for next year, sat down with RA Exchange for a lengthy 45-minute question-and-answer session. The podcast from electronic music magazine Resident Advisor typically brings musicians, label heads, and other music industry personnel onto their program to discuss the music scene other related topics to the guests. From Giorgio Moroder, Claude VonStroke, and Maceo Plex as some of the biggest names RA Exchange has had on their podcast recently, Eric Prydz joins them as one of the biggest names to grace the show.

On their 280th episode, RA asked Eric Prydz about his three most popular aliases between his own name, Pryda, and Cirez D and the factors the separate these entities. In the interview he states, “Pryda is very melodic and experimental and I can just do what I want..while the music on Mouseville [Cirez D] has been very club oriented..kind of influenced by European Techno…” He later goes on to say that music released under Eric Prydz is what he considers to be the more “commercial, viable” direction of his musical creativity.

Another major chunk of the interview dived into his most recent activity involving the Pryda 10 volumes released over the summer and fall of this year. While expressing his pride and astonishment at the fact that his label has continued to push out music for a decade, Eric Prydz also talks about the flexibility and control of the label saying, “I’ve never really treated it as a record company…it is just a forum for me to do whatever I want artistically.” As a special accolade for reaching ten years with his music and label, Eric Prydz delivered over 22 previously unreleased tracks that fans have been drooling over for years.

Speaking of the 22 tracks that were unreleased, Eric also talked about why some tracks were released and others were held back. He states, “I don’t make music with the purpose to release it. I never have.” With some of the tracks dating back to as early as 2005, Eric Prydz also spoke about leaving them the way they were originally made saying that if he edited them or updated them they would “lose their magic”.

If you want to listen to the full interview, check out the SoundCloud link below and listen to Eric Prydz talk about these topics along with his recent Los Angeles residency, his inspirations, his preferences between playing clubs or festivals, and much more.

H/T: We Rave You